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Unique Suite of Programs:

The PHJV partnership was established to deliver the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) on the Canadian prairies. NAWMP remains the PHJV's key focus today. The continental NAWMP goal is to restore waterfowl populations to the levels of the 1970s. Since inception, the PHJV planned for a unique mix of land management programs and policy work.

PHJV VISION:
The vision of the Prairie Habitat Joint Venture is of healthy prairie, parkland and boreal landscapes that support sustainable bird populations and provide ecological and economic benefits for society.

PHJV MISSION:
The Prairie Habitat Joint Venture mission is to provide leadership to achieve healthy and diverse waterfowl and other bird populations through conservation partnerships. These partnerships strive for sustainable and responsible management of the landscape taking into account social, economic and environmental factors.

PHJV BIRD POPULATION GOALS:
Sustain Average Waterfowl Populations of the 1970s.
Set population objectives for the priority species for Landbirds, Shorebirds and Waterbirds.
Set habitat objectives for the priority species for Waterfowl, Landbirds, Shorebirds and Waterbirds.

PHJV HABITAT GOALS:
Stop further wetland loss.
Stop further loss of native lands, especially native grasslands.
Restore lost wetlands, especially small basins.
Restore function of upland habitats in landscapes conductive for maintenance of bird populations.

PRAIRIE PARKLAND PROGRAM:

WESTERN BOREAL PROGRAM:

WATERFOWL:
The goal of the PHJV is to Sustain Average Waterfowl Populations of the 1970's

Species
Population Goal for the Canadian Prairie Pothole Region (x1000)
  Mallard
4,607
  Northern Pintail
3,344
  Gadwall
1,013
  American Wigeon
1,267
  Green-winged Teal
848
  Blue-winged Teal
2,671
  Northern Shoveler
1,212
  Readhead
422
  Canvasback
349
  Scaup
1,374

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goal for Species of Concern:

Pintails require a different mix of habitat adjustments and targeting than is provided by the traditional waterfowl program. Given the importance of the PPR to the ultimate recovery of pintails, pintail-specific habitat objectives need to be developed using the Waterfowl Productivity Model.

Scaup and Scoters have also demonstrated serious population declines since inventories were initiated in the 1950's. It is unclear what factor(s) are driving populations. Research is needed to better understand the population dynamics of these.

SHOREBIRDS:
Wetlands of the PHJV provide critical breeding and migratory habitat for 25 species of shorebirds including 7 priority breeding species and 8 priority passage migrants. For more information, please read Prairie Canada Shorebird Conservation Plan.

LANDBIRDS:
Within the PHJV, 259 landbird species have been identified with 22 species as a priority for conservation. Grassland birds are the most thretened group of birds within North America. One of the goals of the PHJV is to maintain remaining native grasslands and to convert cropland to grass in support of these birds. For more information, please read Landbird Conservation Plan, Prairie Pothole Bird Conservation Region 11 in Canada.

WATERBIRDS:
In the PHJV, 30 species of waterbirds exist, eight of which are high priority species for conservation. Although knowledge is limited, scientists believe the region is particularly important and are conducting additional surveys and research. Wetland loss/deterioration combined with upland loss/deterioration are the top conservation issues/threats faced by waterbirds in the PHJV. Key breeding areas of colonial nesters is concentrated to specific lakes and marshes that are important to waterfowl and shorebirds. Fore more information, please read Northern Prairie Parkland Waterbird Conservation Plan.

PHJV POLICY INITIATIVES:
Conservation friendly public policies and programs are critical to the Prairie Habitat Joint Venture's success. A variety of policies impact how the Canadian prairie landscape is managed. PHJV partners promote decisions that improve the ecological health of the landscape and its duck production potential while balancing the needs of other land users.

Broad landscape change has long been recognized as a vital component to achieving the goals of the PHJV. The policy initiatives undertaken by PHJV partners will contribute to attaining these goals.

2009 National Ecological Goods and Services Technical Meeting:

PHJV SCIENCE:
Adaptive management, fueled by the best science available, is a hallmark of PHJV planning and implementation.

Science is the foundation of the Prairie Habitat Joint Venture's multi-faceted landscape program. The PHJV is committed to ongoing evaluation and adaptive management to build a prairie landscape that assures sustainable support for waterfowl and other wildlife.

Expanding the scientific knowledge of the PHJV is critical. Alongside program implementation, partners undertake a number of major scientific initiatives to continually imporove and evaluated the program. A new science based tool, the Waterfowl Productivity Model, has been developed to better measure the impact of the PHJV program on duck populations and to refine program delivery. This model is being used to update the PHJV Provincial Implementation Plans.